Adam Minter is an American writer based in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, where he serves as a columnist for Bloomberg View. From 2002 to 2014, he lived and wrote in Shanghai, China, where he focused on a range of topics, including Chinese politics, the environment, business, and religion. His work has been published in a range of publications, including The Atlantic, The Wall Street Journal, The Los Angeles Times, Sierra, Bloomberg BusinessWeek, National Geographic, The National Interest, Mother Jones, and others.

Minter's first book, Junkyard Planet: Travels in the Billion Dollar Trash Trade, is an insider's account of the global waste and recycling industry. Minter is a widely-cited expert on the global trade in recyclables, and he has lectured on the topic around the world.

Last Updated: February 26, 2015

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