Ira Kalish is Chief Global Economist at Deloitte. He is a specialist in global economic issues as well as the effects of economic, demographic, and social trends on the global business environment. He has written about the economies of Western Europe, Eastern Europe, Southeast Asia, China, Japan, Mexico and South America, and has also written extensively on global consumer markets. Among Kalish’s recent publications were the quarterly Global Economic Outlook, of which he is the managing editor; the annual Global Powers of Retailing report; China and India: Comparing the World’s Hottest Consumer Markets; China and India: The Reality Beyond the Hype, Budget Deficits: Why All the Fuss, an article in CFO Journal, and “Mind The Gap,” an article in Deloitte Review on changing income distribution.

Kalish advises Deloitte clients as well as Deloitte’s leadership on economic issues and their impact on business strategy. In addition, he has given numerous presentations to corporations and trade organizations on topics related to the global economy. He is widely traveled and has given presentations in 47 countries on six continents. Kalish has been widely quoted in the news media; his remarks have been published by the Wall Street Journal, The Economist, The Financial Times, USA Today, The Washington Post, and U.S. News & World Report. He has appeared on CNN, CBS News, CNBC, PBS and BBC World Service. Prior to his work at Deloitte, Kalish was chief economist at Retail Forward, vice president at Bankers Trust, corporate economist at the Eastman Kodak Company, and researcher at the Institute for International Economics. Kalish holds a bachelor’s degree in economics from Vassar College and a PhD in international economics from Johns Hopkins University. He lives in Santa Monica, CA with his wife and daughters.

Last Updated: December 16, 2015



How Much Does the Chinese Market Matter to the World?

Yukon Huang, Ira Kalish & more
China’s main market, reflected in the Shanghai Composite Index, has fallen 24 percent since June 12, losing $2.4 trillion in value. While many analysts are focused on the financial crisis in Greece, some are beginning to wonder if China's woes...