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01.13.2015

This Culture Has Not Yet Been Rated

Bethany Allen-Ebrahimian

It all started with plunging necklines. After the sudden withdrawal and subsequent sanitizing of a popular Chinese show, viewers in China have renewed longstanding calls to strip government censors of their power, using one simple solution...

Caixin Media

01.06.2015

In Praise of Hu Feng

Sheila Melvin

Hu Feng (1902-85) is a name that most students of P.R.C. history have undoubtedly encountered at one time or another. I remember reading it for the first time years ago in Jonathan Spence’s “The Search for Modern China.” It stuck in my...

Reports

01.01.2015

The Politburo’s Predicament

Drawing on an analysis of hundreds of official documents, censorship directives, and human rights reports, as well as some 30 expert interviews, the study finds that the overall degree of repression has increased under the new leadership....

Sinica Podcast

12.26.2014

Regulating the Fourth Estate in China

Kaiser Kuo

The explosion of the commercial media sphere in China over the last decade hasn’t been particularly subtle, especially if you’re anything like us and walk past multiple Chinese newsstands in the morning.

Reporting & Opinion

12.23.2014

China in 2014 Through the Eyes of a Human Rights Advocate

Yaxue Cao

This time last year, volunteers and I were busy writing and translating articles to prepare for the New Citizens Movement trials.

Media

12.08.2014

On First Annual Constitution Day, China’s Most Censored Word Was ‘Constitution’

Bethany Allen-Ebrahimian

On December 4, China’s first annual Constitution Day, Communist Party mouthpiece People’s Daily posted the complete text of the Chinese constitution to its Weibo microblogging account, accompanied by the upbeat hashtag: “Let’s all read the...

Conversation

12.03.2014

Can China Conquer the Internet?

David Bandurski, Jeremy Goldkorn, Rogier Creemers, Xiao Qiang, Jason Q. Ng

Lu Wei, China’s new Internet Czar, recently tried to get the world to agree to a model of information control designed by the Chinese Communist Party.

Environment

11.26.2014

The People’s Republic of Chemicals

chinadialogue

The name of China is almost obscured by a grey smudge on the title page of The People’s Republic of Chemicals, and this image proves to be apt.  This book examines the crisis caused by toxic smogs that periodically choke vast regions of...

Sinica Podcast

11.25.2014

Internet Wrangling in Wuzhen

Kaiser Kuo, Rogier Creemers

Kaiser Kuo hosts alone this week as we turn our attention to the World Internet Conference (English site) last week, when a last minute attempt by Chinese organizers to foist the so-called Wuzhen Declaration on participants provoked an...

Viewpoint

11.21.2014

“Getting Pantsed” by the “Central People’s Court”

Hu Yong

In December of last year CCTV producer Wang Qinglei wrote a post on his Weibo account criticizing the Chinese government’s campaign-style attacks on prominent social media figures and arguing the media had also been drawn in and was “...

Viewpoint

10.14.2014

On Dealing with Chinese Censors

Joseph W. Esherick

It was a hot afternoon in June in the East China city of Jinan. I was returning to my hotel after an afternoon coffee, thinking of the conference I had come to attend and trying to escape the heat on the shady side of the street. My cell...

Caixin Media

10.06.2014

Lost in Translation

Caixin

Is selective translation of news articles from the foreign media more insidious than no translation at all? The debate was sparked by a garbled translation of the cover story of the Economist headlined “What Does China Want?”

Media

09.29.2014

In China, the Most Censored Day of the Year

Bethany Allen-Ebrahimian

Censors on Weibo, China’s massive Twitter-like microblogging platform, just had their biggest day of the year. And once again, it was events in the special administrative region of Hong Kong, not the Chinese mainland, that triggered it.

Culture

08.27.2014

Standing Up for Indie Film in China

Jonathan Landreth

In July, Transformers: Age of Extinction, the fourth in the action-packed series of Hollywood films about trucks turning into giant robots to save the world, became the first film to sell more than $300 million in tickets at China’s box ...

Culture

08.26.2014

Healthy Words

Alec Ash

In 1902, Lu Xun translated Jules Verne’s From the Earth to the Moon into Chinese from the Japanese edition. Science fiction, he wrote in the preface, was “as rare as unicorn horns, which shows in a way the intellectual poverty of our time...

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