Chinese Students in America Say ‘Not My President’

Bethany Allen-Ebrahimian
Foreign Policy
The first posters appeared on a bulletin board at University of California, San Diego on March 1.

How China Is Winning Back More Graduates from Foreign Universities Than Ever Before

Luke Kelly
Forbes
Where it was once inevitable that those who left to study at prestigious foreign universities would remain on distant shores for years, China’s graduates are now answering the call of home more than ever before -- and many are turning down lucrative...

Ad Promises Students 'You Won't Feel Like You're in China When You're on Our Buses'

AnneClaire Stapleton
CNN
At first glance, it looks like any other email touting travel deals. In this case, it was a bus company offering its services to students of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

China Is Retaliating against a US University for Inviting the Dalai Lama to Speak at Graduation

Josh Horwitz
Quartz
Beijing has a lesson for overseas universities: Don’t invite speakers who oppose the Communist Party to big events.

Conversation

05.25.17

Can Free Speech on American Campuses Withstand Chinese Nationalism?

Yifu Dong, Edward Friedman & more
Earlier this week, Kunming native Yang Shuping, a student at the University of Maryland, gave a commencement speech extolling the “fresh air” and “free speech” she experienced while studying in the United States. Video of her speech spread on the...

Expensive Foreign Degrees Lose Edge in Competitive Chinese Job Market, Study Finds

Teng Jing Xuan and Wang Mingting
Nearly 70% of Chinese students who returned after studying abroad said they were "unsatisfied" with job opportunities ...

US University Admissions Officers Courted with Subsidized Trips to China

Coco Feng and Liao Yuanxin
Reports that Chinese education agencies buy US college admissions staff trips to China have fueled speculation that bribery is part of the recruitment process

Conversation

06.03.16

Should I Stay or Should I Go?

Yidi Wu, Ding Feng & more
It’s graduation time, and Chinese graduates from American colleges are now pondering what to do next: return to China or stay in the U.S. We reached out to recent graduates to ask about their decision-making process and how they view their prospects...

Media

10.23.15

The Eagle, the Dragon, and the ‘Excellent Sheep’

Former Yale University English professor William Deresiewicz’s book, Excellent Sheep: The Miseducation of the American Elite and the Way to a Meaningful Life, created a firestorm in the United States when it was released in August 2014. “The...

China’s Economic Crisis Ripples at Area Colleges

Laura Krantz and Jacqueline Tempera
Boston Globe
As of last year, more than 13,000 Chinese students were attending college in Boston, out of a total of 44,000 foreign students in the city.

U.S. Students Losing Interest in China as Dream Jobs Prove Elusive

Alexandra Harney
Reuters
Waning interest worries those who view having Americans who speak Chinese as a matter of national interest.

Infographics

12.15.14

Is Studying Abroad Worth the Cost?

from Sohu
The number of Chinese students who choose to study abroad has increased by more than 1,000% since 2000. Yet education costs abroad also continue to rise. This infographic looks at reasons why Chinese students are choosing an education overseas.

U.S. Colleges Finding Ideals Tested Abroad

Tamar Lewin
New York Times
Like U.S. corporations, American colleges are extending their brands overseas. But colleges claim to place ideals over income. As professors abroad face consequences for what they say, most universities are doing little more than wringing their...

Seeking Edge in Academics, Chinese Spend Summer in U.S.

Jane Perlez and Helen Gao
New York Times
The surge in students traveling to the United States for the summer is the latest iteration in China’s booming multibillion-dollar overseas education business.  

Findings From The 2013 C.G.S. International Graduate Admissions Survey

Leila M. Gonzales, Jeannette K...
Council of Graduate Schools
A slowdown in international applicants to U.S. graduate schools is partially due to a nearly five percent decline in applicants coming from China.