Title

Economist

From their website:

Established in 1843 to campaign on one of the great political issues of the day, The Economist remains, in the second half of its second century, true to the principles of its founder. James Wilson, a hat maker from the small Scottish town of Hawick, believed in free trade, internationalism and minimum interference by government, especially in the affairs of the market. Though the protectionist Corn Laws which inspired Wilson to start The Economist were repealed in 1846, the newspaper has lived on, never abandoning its commitment to the classical 19th-century Liberal ideas of its founder.

Last Updated: July 7, 2016

Hong Kong Heats Up Again

J.C.
Economist
Masked men attacked pro-democracy protesters for the second time in as many weeks on the morning of October 13th near Hong Kong’s Admiralty business district.

Why Hong Kong Remains Vital to China’s Economy

S.R.
Economist
Foreign companies also use Hong Kong as their staging post for investing in China as it offers them something that no mainland city does: a stable investment environment, protected by long-established rule of law.Although much of this money is...

A New Central Banker for China?

http://www.economist.com/blogs/...
Economist
In the world of rumours, Zhou Xiaochuan, China’s central bank chief, has lost his job multiple times. First there was a 2007 reshuffle when he was pushed aside early in his tenure, sidelined to an academic role.

Uighur Scholar Ilham Tohti Sentenced—A Moderate Silenced

Gady Epstein
Economist
Though he has always advocated nonviolence and says he opposes separatism, Mr Tohti appears to be paying a price for a series of episodes of violent unrest involving Uighurs.

The China Wave

Economist
Chinese management ideas are beginning to get the attention they deserve.

The Struggle for Hong Kong

Economist
The territory’s citizens must not give up demanding full democracy—for their sake and for China’s.

Trust-busting in China

Economist
 Unequal before the law? China’s antitrust crackdown turns ugly, with foreign carmakers at the forefront.

Vietnam and China—Through a Border Darkly

Economist
Relations between two Communist neighbors are at their lowest point in decades.

China Jails Foreign Sleuths

Nicola Davison
Economist
A Shanghai court sentenced British corporate detective Peter Humphrey to 2.5 years in prison for illegally obtaining private information on Chinese citizens for pharmaceutical firm GlaxoSmithKline. 

Congratulations! Inoculations!

Economist
The World Health Organization gives China a glowing report for its lowering of infant and maternal mortality rates.

Anti-corruption Drive—Anchor away: A Famous Newsman is Detained

Economist
In the midst of an ongoing anti-corruption campaign popular, jet-setting China Central Television “Economic News” anchor Rui Changgang is questioned.

Big Brother Comes Wooing

Economist
For more than six decades after the Chinese civil war, the mainland did not allow its minister-level officials openly to set foot in Taiwan. This changed on June 25th when Zhang Zhijun, director of China’s Taiwan Affairs Office, visited the island...

A Showdown Looms

Economist
Hong Kong, China’s most prosperous city, is becoming dangerously polarized.

Rigged: Comradely Relations Go From Bad to Worse

Economist
Vietnam and China share a long history of enmity—and of managing to patch things up when they go wrong. But their latest dispute is not running true to form.

Where the Flame Still Burns

J. C.
Economist
Hong Kong is the only place on Chinese soil where large public commemorations of the Tiananmen massacre take place; elsewhere memorials of the June 4th crackdown remain strictly forbidden.