Title

Economist

From their website:

Established in 1843 to campaign on one of the great political issues of the day, The Economist remains, in the second half of its second century, true to the principles of its founder. James Wilson, a hat maker from the small Scottish town of Hawick, believed in free trade, internationalism and minimum interference by government, especially in the affairs of the market. Though the protectionist Corn Laws which inspired Wilson to start The Economist were repealed in 1846, the newspaper has lived on, never abandoning its commitment to the classical 19th-century Liberal ideas of its founder.

Last Updated: July 7, 2016

China and Russia: Best Frenemies

Economist
Does the new collaboration between Russia and China amount to a renewal of the alliance against America?

China’s Losers: Disillusioned Office Workers

Gady Epstein
Economist
Amid spreading prosperity, a generation of self-styled also-rans emerges.

The World’s Second Biggest Consumer

S.C.
Economist
Based on The Economist's calculations, China outpaced Japan as the world’s second-biggest consumer economy last year...

The Original Manchurian Candidate

G.E.
Economist
In 1868 Anson Burlingame became not only America’s first minister to China to reside in Beijing, but also China’s first ambassador to the world.

China's Deluxed Hotels: Modern Sumptuary Laws

Economist
The new humility of both officials and hotels is a response to Xi's campaign against lavish spending. ...

China Loses its Allure

Economist
Life is getting tougher for foreign companies. Those that want to stay will have to adjust.

Malaria Eradication—Cure All?

Economist
A novel approach, using drugs from a South China company, instead of insecticides, may make it easier to eliminate malaria. But it is not without controversy.

Politics in Taiwan: Daggers Drawn

Economist
Though he is often accused of being ineffectual, it is actually a rare show of decisiveness that has lost Ma Ying-jeou recent support. At issue is his handling of alleged wrongdoing by a titan of Mr. Ma’s Kuomintang (K.M.T.), Wang Jin-pyng. 

Political Maneuvering: The Plot Thickens

Economist
Xi Jinping has been taking down crooked officials in an attempt to consolidate power and make good on a promise to clean up the Party. But what does it mean now he’s set his sights on former chief of domestic security and one-time oilman...

Blood and Money

Economist
Of all the investigations and lawsuits affecting financial firms in America, few have wider ramifications than a reported probe by the S.E.C. into whether JPMorgan Chase hired the children of senior Chinese officials in order to help the bank win...

Political Rebalancing: Tilting Backwards

J.M.
Economist
The speed with which Mr Xi has moved to establish his conservative ideological credentials, having at first struck a somewhat more liberal tone, has still been a surprise to some observers.  

Can China Clean Up Fast Enough?

Economist
China is going through an industrial-powered growth spurt and the urge to get rich outweighs the desire for clean air. However, China is beginning to clean up its act.

Urbanisation: Some Are More Equal Than Others

Economist
Rural migrants living in the handshake buildings are still second-class citizens, most of whom have no access to urban health care or to the city’s high schools. Their homes could be demolished at any time. 

Ideological Debate: Drawing the Battle Lines

J.M.
Economist
Xi Jinping’s lip service to liberalization and constitutionalism has emboldened advocates of political reform. Party officials have responded by rallying against constitutionalism and warning activists to not adopt Western ideals. 

Settlers in Xinjiang: Circling the Wagons

Economist
A network of immigrant settlements dominated by Han Chinese are adding to ethnic tensions by excluding ethnic Uighurs from commercial opportunities.