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Check here for updates from our editors on new developments in regulation, operation and activities of Foreign NGOs in China as well as updates to the China NGO Project site

The following interactive graphics display information about currently-registered foreign NGOs’ representative offices in China as provided by the Ministry of Public Security website. The interactive map shows the approximate location of foreign NGOs’ representative offices in China. The filterable table provides the same information in a searchable text format.Read more

Temporary Activities Filterable Table

This filterable table lists the temporary activities that foreign NGOs have filed for since January 2017, and includes foreign NGOs’ activity names, Chinese Partner Units, activity dates, and activity locations. Type your search term(s) in the fields above each column to filter the results. You can filter multiple columns simultaneously.Read more
Following are the Professional Supervisory Units that have sponsored a (or multiple) foreign NGO representative office(s).Read more

‘I Feel Like I Am Committing Crimes’

A Q&A with Legal Rights Advocate Yang Zhanqing
On July 22 last year, three activists from the public interest NGO Changsha Funeng were detained and later formally arrested for “subversion of state power.” Cheng Yuan, Liu Dazhi, and Wu Gejianxiong, known as the “Changsha Three,” have been detained for about seven months. Established in 2016, Changsha Funeng mainly focused on disability rights and also the rights of disadvantaged groups. To understand more about the arrests, public interest work in China, and the challenges...Read more

Civil Society’s Shifting Role in the Response to Coronavirus

Rule Changes Allowing for More NGOs to Get Involved
In our Analysis section, contributor Holly Snape explains how local and central policies at first hobbled domestic civil society organizations’ ability to respond to the coronavirus, limiting who could receive donations, and, critically, who could disburse them. Subsequent rule changes mean that groups are now freer to play a role in collecting and distributing funds and material goods—a hopeful sign for the management of this epidemic.Read more