Evan Osnos joined The New Yorker as a staff writer in 2008. He is a correspondent in Washington, D.C. who writes about politics and foreign affairs. His book Age of Ambition: Chasing Fortune, Truth, and Faith in the New China (Farrar, Straus & Giroux) is based on eight years of living in Beijing.

Previously, Osnos worked as the Beijing Bureau Chief of The Chicago Tribune, where he contributed to a series that won the 2008 Pulitzer Prize for investigative reporting. He has received the Asia Society’s Osborn Elliott Prize for Excellence in Journalism on Asia, the Livingston Award for Young Journalists, and a Mirror Award for profile-writing. He has also worked as a contributor to This American Life and a correspondent for FRONTLINE/World, a public-television series. Before his appointment in China, he worked in the Middle East, reporting mostly from Iraq.

Last Updated: September 22, 2014

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