James Whitlow Delano

Bakugai!

Chinese ‘Explosive’ Shoppers in Japan

James Whitlow Delano

History has not favored power-sharing on the world’s most populated continent. For millennia, China dominated as East Asia’s greatest force, its culture shaping civilizations across the region. In a more recent era, Japan reigned, boasting the continent’s mightiest economy and military. The interstices between these empires’ rises and falls were often marked by war. Today, as China eclipses Japan, history buffs might fret about conflict again breaking out between old foes. They haven’t factored in bakugai.The Japanese term, a compound word made up of “explosion” (baku) and buying (gai), refers to the swarms of Chinese tourists who have descended on Japan in a consumerist frenzy documented...


Kevin Frayer—Getty Images

Whose Century Is It, Anyway?

A Sinica Podcast

Kaiser Kuo, Jeremy Goldkorn & more via Sinica Podcast

Veteran China journalists Mary Kay Magistad and Gady Epstein discuss the increasingly complex “frenemyship” of China and the United States, the South China Sea, the role of “old China hands,” and how the Middle Kingdom is changing the world and being changed by it.


STR/AFP/Getty Images

New Territory For Financial Oversight Reform

By Hu Shuli

via Caixin

An intense battle for control of China’s largest, publicly traded developer China Vanke Co. has exposed flaws in the nation’s financial supervision system that demand urgent attention.Vanke management and Baoneng Group, a property and insurance conglomerate, have been battling since July 2015 over stock purchases through which Baoneng rose to become Vanke’s largest shareholder.Against management’s wishes, Baoneng over the course of several months gradually raised its stake to more than 25 percent. Vanke countered by suspending the trading of all its shares on the Shenzhen Stock Exchange—a suspension that began last December and ended in early July.Vanke management put more pressure on...


(China Photos/Getty Images)

Sex Workers and Condoms

Charmain Mohamed & Shen Tingting

China has long taken a punitive approach to sex work, but sex workers in China have recently experienced the harshest crackdown in a decade. The “strike hard” campaigns which began in Beijing and Dongguan in 2010 and 2014 respectively, ultimately spawning a nationwide crackdown. These campaigns led to the shutdown of thousands of entertainment venues and the detention of tens of thousands of sex workers.


There Are a Lot More Chinese Soldiers in Africa Today... And Likely More To Come

A China in Africa Podcast

Eric Olander, Cobus van Staden & more via China Africa Project

Around 2014, the Chinese began to shift their military engagement strategy in Africa to include the deployment of combat-ready infantry units to countries like Mali and South Sudan where the United Nations is being actively targeted by Islamist radicals and partisan fighters.


Kevin Frayer—Getty Images

More Than 100 Chinese Muslims Have Joined the Islamic State

Leaked ISIS Documents Suggest Uighur Fighters Are Seeking a New Home and A Sense of Belonging

Bethany Allen-Ebrahimian via Tea Leaf Nation

A July 20 report from New America, a think tank in Washington, DC, examined more than 4,000 registration records of fighters who joined the Islamic State between mid-2013 and mid-2014.


John Moore—Getty Images

Chengdu’s Pollution Is Complicated by Taxi Apps

via chinadialogue

Research carried out by Peking University’s Statistical Science Centre and Guanghua School of Management found that Chengdu suffers from air pollution 88 percent of the time—even worse than Beijing at 76 percent.

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Recent Stories

Conversation

07.20.16

How Should the Republican Party Approach China Policy?

Peter Navarro, Patrick Chovanec & more
On Tuesday, delegates to the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio, chose Donald J. Trump as their nominee for President of the United States. We asked a range of contributors how the Republican Party should approach China policy.

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07.01.16

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06.28.16

John Birch

Terry Lautz
John Birch was better known in death than life. Shot and killed by Communists in China in 1945, he posthumously became the namesake for a right-wing organization whose influence is still visible in today’s Tea Party. This is the remarkable story of who he actually was: an American missionary-turned-soldier who wanted to save China, but instead became a victim. Terry Lautz, a longtime scholar of U.S.-China relations, has investigated archives, spoken with three of Birch’s brothers, found letters written to the women he loved, and visited sites in China where he lived and died. The result, John Birch: A Life, is the first authoritative biography of this fascinating figure whose name was appropriated for a political cause.Raised as a Baptist fundamentalist, Birch became a missionary to China prior to America’s entry into the Second World War. After Pearl Harbor, he volunteered for the U.S. Army in China, served with Claire Chennault, Commander of the famed Flying Tigers, and operated behind enemy lines as an intelligence officer. He planned to resume his missionary work after the war, but was killed in a dispute with Communist troops just days after Japan’s surrender. During the heyday of the Cold War in the 1950s, Robert Welch, a retired businessman from Boston, chose Birch as the figurehead for the John Birch Society, believing that his death was evidence of conspiracy at the highest levels of government. The Birch Society became one of the most polarizing organizations of its time, and the name of John Birch became synonymous with right-wing extremism.Cutting through the layers of mythology surrounding Birch, Lautz deftly presents his life and his afterlife, placing him not only in the context of anti-communism but in the longstanding American quest to shape China’s destiny. —Oxford University Press{chop}

Books

06.15.16

Street of Eternal Happiness

Rob Schmitz
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Reports

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05.20.15

Censorship and Conscience

Alexa Olesen
Alexa Olesen
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Reports

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Revising U.S. Grand Strategy Toward China

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Council on Foreign Relations
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