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Viewpoint

05.19.15

Hong Kong’s Not That Special, And Beijing Should Stop Saying It Is

Alvin Y.H. Cheung
<p class="dropcap">As political wrangling in Hong Kong <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/23/world/asia/hong-kong-presents-plan-for-elections-offering-little-to-democrats.html?ref=topics&amp;_r=0" target="...

Media

05.11.15

Interactive Map: Follow the Roads, Railways, and Pipelines on China’s New Silk Road

Reid Standish & Bethany Allen-Ebrahimian
Foreign Policy has put together an interactive guide tracking Beijing’s victories and obstacles along the new Silk Road. The list of participating countries is still not finalized, but with China forking out billions in trade deals and preferential...

Caixin Media

05.05.15

A Byronic Hero for China’s Supremo

<p>A little known vignette about Xi Jinping’s fondness for Song Jiang, a fictional hero in the 14th century classic novel <em>The Water Margin</em>, gives a peek into the private thoughts of China’s most powerful man. For someone...

Conversation

04.29.15

Is China Building Up Soft Power by Aiding Nepal?

Ashok Gurung, Zha Daojiong & more
<p>A devastating earthquake has struck one of China’s smallest neighbors, the mountainous former kingdom known, since 2008, as the Federal Democratic Republic of Nepal. Surrounded on three sides by India—known in Nepali as a “friendly nation”—...

The Wonderfully Elusive Chinese Novel

Perry Link
In teaching Chinese-language courses to American students, which I have done about thirty times, perhaps the most anguishing question I get is “Professor Link, what is the Chinese word for ______?”

Media

04.14.15

Henry Paulson: ‘Dealing with China’

Eric Fish
<p>Speaking at Asia Society New York on April 13 with <em>New Yorker</em> correspondent <a href="http://www.chinafile.com/contributors/evan-osnos" target="_blank">Evan Osnos</a>, former U.S. Treasury...

Culture

04.10.15

A New Opera and Hong Kong’s Utopian Legacy

Denise Y. Ho
<p class="dropcap">This year, the 43rd annual Hong Kong Arts Festival <a href="https://www.hk.artsfestival.org/en/programmes/datong-the-chinese-utopia.html" target="_blank">commissioned</a> a chamber...

Viewpoint

04.10.15

Bury Zhao Ziyang, and Praise Him

Julian B. Gewirtz
<p>Zhao Ziyang, the premier and general secretary of the ruling Chinese Communist Party (CCP) in the 1980s, died on January 17, 2005. At a <a href="http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/english/doc/2005-01/29/content_413413.htm" target=...

Chinese Dreams and the African Renaissance

Eric Olander, Cobus van Staden & more
<p>Leaders in both China and Africa have articulated new visions for their respective regions that project a strong sense of confidence, renewal, and a break from once-dominant Western ideologies. In both cases, argues <a href="https...

Books

04.09.15

Revolutionary Cycles in Chinese Cinema, 1951-1979

Zhuoyi Wang
A comprehensive history of how the conflicts and balances of power in the Maoist revolutionary campaigns from 1951 to 1979 complicated and diversified the meanings of films, this book offers a discursive study of the development of early PRC cinema. Wang closely investigates how film artists, Communist Party authorities, cultural bureaucrats, critics, and audiences negotiated, competed, and struggled with each other for the power to decide how to use films and how their extensively different, agonistic, and antagonistic power strategies created an ever-changing discursive network of meaning in cinema. —Palgrave Macmillan{chop}

Sinica Podcast

04.07.15

Cyber Leninism and the Political Culture of the Chinese Internet

Kaiser Kuo, David Moser & more
<p>Kaiser Kuo and David Moser speak with Rogier Creemers, post-doctoral fellow at Oxford with a focus on Chinese Internet governance and author of the <a href="https://chinacopyrightandmedia.wordpress.com" target="_blank...

Books

04.02.15

Muslim, Trader, Nomad, Spy

Sulmaan Wasif Khan
In 1959, the Dalai Lama fled Lhasa, leaving the People's Republic of China with a crisis on its Tibetan frontier. Sulmaan Wasif Khan tells the story of the PRC's response to that crisis and, in doing so, brings to life an extraordinary cast of characters: Chinese diplomats appalled by sky burials, Guomindang spies working with Tibetans in Nepal, traders carrying salt across the Himalayas, and Tibetan Muslims rioting in Lhasa. What Chinese policymakers confronted in Tibet, Khan argues, was not a "third world" but a "fourth world" problem: Beijing was dealing with peoples whose ways were defined by statelessness. As it sought to tighten control over the restive borderlands, Mao's China moved from a lighter hand to a harder, heavier imperial structure. That change triggered long-lasting shifts in Chinese foreign policy. Moving from capital cities to far-flung mountain villages, from top diplomats to nomads crossing disputed boundaries in search of pasture, this book shows Cold War China as it has never been seen before and reveals the deep influence of the Tibetan crisis on the political fabric of present-day China. —The University of North Carolina Press{chop}

Reports

04.01.15

U.S.-China 21: The Future of U.S.-China Relations Under Xi Jinping

Kevin Rudd
Harvard University
<p>We are, therefore, seeing the emergence of an asymmetric world in which the fulcrums of economic and military power are no longer co-located, but, in fact, are beginning to diverge significantly. Political power, through the agency of...

Sinica Podcast

03.30.15

Comfort Women and the Struggle for Reparations

Kaiser Kuo
<p>Kaiser talks with Lucy Hornby, China correspondent for the <em>Financial Times</em> and author of a <a href="http://www.ft.com/cms/s/2/b44ae604-cdc1-11e4-8760-00144feab7de.html" target="_blank">recent...

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