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Wang Lixiong and Woeser: A Way Out of China’s Ethnic Unrest?

Ian Johnson

Woeser and Wang Lixiong are two of China’s best-known thinkers on the government’s policy toward ethnic minorities. With violence in Tibet and Xinjiang now almost a monthly occurrence, I met them at their apartment in Beijing to talk about...

Conversation

08.11.2014

Simon Leys Remembered

Isabel Hilton, Perry Link, Ian Buruma, Orville Schell

Isabel Hilton: When I heard the news of the death of Pierre Ryckmans, better known by his pen name, Simon Leys, I began to hunt in my bookshelves for the now yellowing and grimy copies of Chinese Shadows and The Chairman’s New Clothes: Mao...

Culture

08.11.2014

The Bard in Beijing

Sheila Melvin

At the end of a rollicking production of William Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream—directed by Tim Robbins and staged in China in June by the Los Angeles-based Actors’ Gang—the director and actors returned to the stage for a dialogue...

Conversation

07.31.2014

Zhou Yongkang’s Downfall

Sebastian Veg, Roderick MacFarquhar, Taisu Zhang, Richard McGregor, Zha Daojiong, Andrew Wedeman

On July 29, the Central Commission for Discipline Inspection of the Chinese Communisty Party announced it was investigating ex-security czar Zhou Yongkang “on suspicion of grave violations of discipline.” Zhou, who retired from the...

Environment

07.10.2014

U.S.-China Climate Cooperation More Crucial Than Ever

chinadialogue

As the governments of the United States and China meet in Beijing this week for the Sixth U.S.-China Strategic and Economic Dialogue (S&ED), one area worth watching closely is clean energy and climate change cooperation. While this...

Tibet Resists

Jonathan Mirsky

Tsering Woeser was born in Lhasa in 1966, the daughter of a senior officer in the Chinese army. She became a passionate supporter of the Dalai Lama. When she was very young the family moved to Tibetan towns inside China proper. In school,...

Conversation

07.09.2014

The U.S. and China Are At the Table: What’s At Stake?

William Adams, Zha Daojiong

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and Treasury Secretary Jack Lew are in Beijing this week for the sixth session of the high level bilateral diplomatic exchange known as the Strategic and Economic Dialogue. We asked contributors what...

Features

07.02.2014

China’s Fallen Mighty

Ouyang Bin, Zhang Mengqi, David M. Barreda, Youyou Zhou

Political infighting and purges have been hallmarks of the Chinese Communist Party since its earliest days but came to a peak during Mao Zedong’s Cultural Revolution, damaging the country and paralyzing the Party itself. When Mao died in...

Books

06.25.2014

Chinese Comfort Women

Laura Chang

During the Asia-Pacific War, the Japanese military forced hundreds of thousands of women across Asia into “comfort stations” where they were repeatedly raped and tortured. Japanese imperial forces claimed they recruited women to join these...

Conversation

06.11.2014

Is a Declining U.S. Good for China?

Zha Daojiong, Gordon G. Chang, Ian Buruma, Hugh White , Chen Weihua, Peter Gries, Wu Jianmin

Zha Daojiong: Talk of a U.S. decline is back in vogue. This time, China features more (if not most) prominently in a natural follow-up question: Which country is going to benefit? My answer: certainly not China. Arguably, the first round...

Caixin Media

06.10.2014

A Jesuit Astronomer in a Qing Emperor’s Court

Caixin, Sheila Melvin

Of the 920 Jesuits who served in the China mission between 1552 and 1800, only the Italian Matteo Ricci (Li Madou) remains well known. This is understandable—it was Ricci who first gained permission for the Jesuits to live in Beijing and...

Books

06.09.2014

Voices from Tibet

Laura Chang, Robert Barnett

Tsering Woeser and Wang Lixiong are widely regarded as the most eloquent, insightful writers on contemporary Tibet. Their reportage on the economic exploitation, environmental degradation, cultural destruction, and political subjugation...

The Ghosts of Tiananmen Square

Ian Johnson

Every spring, an old friend of mine named Xu Jue makes a trip to the Babaoshan cemetery in the western suburbs of Beijing to lay flowers on the tombs of her dead son and husband. She always plans her visit for April 5, which is the holiday...

Media

06.03.2014

A Day to Remember/A Day Forgotten

Susan Jakes

China’s suppression of the memory of the June 4 massacre of demonstrators in Beijing in 1989 is a perennial and important subject of commentary. Much written on the subject is excellent, but little I’ve seen describes repressed memory in...

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