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How China Conquered France’s Wine Country

French connoisseurs sold the Chinese pomp and prestige, until they started manufacturing it themselves.

China's Obesity Epidemic: Teaching Children to 'Eat a Rainbow'

Lucy Luo
The rise in diabetes in China could bankrupt the country’s healthcare system, says a medical expert.

Caixin Media


Government Enlists NGOs to Help Homeless

from Caixin
Drivers roll up car windows as an autumn wind chills a traffic-clogged overpass in western Beijing’s Liuliqiao area. And under the concrete overpass, homeless people are gathering for a chilly night’s rest after wandering city streets.Among the...

China Bends Vow, Using Prisoners’ Organs for Transplants

A senior Chinese health official said last year that China would stop using prisoners’ organs for transplants as of Jan. 1, 2015.

China's Napoleon Complex

Clarissa Sebag-Montefiore
With Deng’s political reforms in the 1980s and 1990s came increased discrimination based on appearance.

China Decries Shenyang Pollution Called 'Worst Ever' by Activists

On Sunday pollution readings were about 50 times higher than that considered safe by the World Health Organization.

China's First Innovative Drug Approved NDA in the U.S.

Shan Juan
This is the first truly innovative drug manufactured in China that passes the audits of FDA and it is about to enter the NDA progress.



China’s Stalk-Burning Clampdown Shows Limits of Command-and-Control

from chinadialogue
At the end of the National Day holiday earlier this month, Beijing bid farewell to weeks of relatively good air quality and experienced another episode of “Airpocalypse.” Levels of PM2.5, tiny pollution particles that are deemed particularly harmful...

Some Chinese Take Aim at Meat Industry After W.H.O. Report on Cancer Risks

Didi Kirsten Tatlow
The Chinese diet is not typically heavy in red meats, but that is changing as growing wealth and Western habits stoke demand.

Nobel Renews Debate on Chinese Medicine

As China basks in its first Nobel Prize in science, few places seem as elated, or bewildered, by the honor as the China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences.

Sinica Podcast


Tu Youyou and the Nobel Prize

Kaiser Kuo, Jeremy Goldkorn, David Moser, Christina Larson, Ian Johnson from Sinica Podcast
This week on Sinica, hosts Kaiser Kuo, Jeremy Goldkorn, and David Moser speak with Christina Larson and Ian Johnson about Tu Youyou, the scientist who recently shared a Nobel Prize in Medicine for her discovery of the anti-malaria compound...



Unmade in China

Jeremy R. Haft
If you look carefully at how things are actually made in China—from shirts to toys, apple juice to oil rigs—you see a reality that contradicts every widely-held notion about the world’s so-called economic powerhouse. From the inside looking out, China is not a manufacturing juggernaut. It’s a Lilliputian. Nor is it a killer of American jobs. It’s a huge job creator. Rising China is importing goods from America in such volume that millions of U.S. jobs are sustained through Chinese trade and investment. In Unmade in China, entrepreneur and Georgetown University business professor Jeremy R. Haft lifts the lid on the hidden world of China’s intricate supply chains. Informed by years of experience building new companies in China, Haft’s unique, insider’s view reveals a startling picture of an economy which struggles to make baby formula safely, much less a nuclear power plant. Using firm-level data and recent case studies, Unmade in China tells the story of systemic risk in Chinese manufacturing and why this is both really bad and really good news for America. —Polity Press{chop}



An International Victory, Forged in China’s Tumultuous Past

Bethany Allen-Ebrahimian
On October 5, a share of this year’s Nobel Prize in medicine went to 84-year-old Chinese pharmacologist Tu Youyou for her discovery, decades ago, of the anti-malarial drug artemisinin. Tu and her team made the discovery during the Cultural...

Youyou Tu: How Mao’s Challenge to Malaria Pioneer Led to Nobel Prize

Tom Phillips
Tasked in 1969 with finding a cure for malaria, China’s first laureate in medicine looked to nature and traditional medicine.

More Working Women in China Freeze Their Eggs

Government limits fertility treatment, so career-focused women turn to U.S. for help in having babies.