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Viewpoint

12.16.2014

What Must China and Japan Do to Get Along in 2015?

Allen Carlson, Zha Daojiong

Last week, Akio Takahara, a professor at the University of Tokyo currently visiting Peking University, wrote a New York Times Op-Ed praising recent diplomatic efforts by Prime Minister Shinzo Abe of Japan and Chinese President Xi Jinping...

Viewpoint

12.16.2014

Why Marx Still Matters: The Ideological Drivers of Chinese Politics

Rogier Creemers

In days of greater political brouhaha, “to go and see Marx” used to be a slang expression among Chinese Communists, to refer to death. More recently, a considerable number of commentators have pronounced the expiry of Marxism itself. China...

Caixin Media

12.11.2014

Sacked Deputy Reform Commissioner Gets Life in Jail for Graft

A former deputy head of the National Development and Reform Commission (NDRC) has been sentenced to life in prison for taking 35.6 million yuan (U.S.$5.8 million) in bribes between 2002 and 2012, according to a microblog post from a...

Media

12.08.2014

On First Annual Constitution Day, China’s Most Censored Word Was ‘Constitution’

Bethany Allen-Ebrahimian

On December 4, China’s first annual Constitution Day, Communist Party mouthpiece People’s Daily posted the complete text of the Chinese constitution to its Weibo microblogging account, accompanied by the upbeat hashtag: “Let’s all read the...

The BRICS Bank: China’s Drive to Shake Up Development Finance

Eric Olander, Cobus van Staden

Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa (aka the ‘BRICS’) are moving forward with an ambitious plan to shake up the clubby world of development finance. The new BRICS bank announced over the summer 2014 is expected to have a profound...

Media

12.05.2014

Repeat After Me: Taiwan’s Recent Elections Had Nothing to Do With Hong Kong

Bethany Allen-Ebrahimian

If China was in fact the invisible candidate in Taiwan’s local elections, it just lost in a landslide.

Infographics

12.05.2014

China’s Fallen Mighty [Graphic]

David M. Barreda, Youyou Zhou, Ouyang Bin, Zhang Mengqi

Over the past thirty-eight years, twelve of China’s top leaders have been purged. This infographic and the bios of these leaders explain how and why these mighty men fell. Download the high-resolution graphic.

Features

12.05.2014

China’s Fallen Mighty [Updated]

Ouyang Bin, Zhang Mengqi, David M. Barreda, Youyou Zhou

Political infighting and purges have been hallmarks of the Chinese Communist Party since its earliest days but came to a peak during Mao Zedong’s Cultural Revolution, damaging the country and paralyzing the Party itself. When Mao died in...

Sinica Podcast

12.05.2014

Domestic Abuse in China

Kaiser Kuo, Jeremy Goldkorn

It doesn’t take a lot of time in China to see household violence play out in supermarkets, in schools, or even in the streets. But exactly how common is domestic violence in China? In the face of recent evidence from Peking University that...

Conversation

12.03.2014

Can China Conquer the Internet?

David Bandurski, Jeremy Goldkorn, Rogier Creemers, Xiao Qiang, Jason Q. Ng

Lu Wei, China’s new Internet Czar, recently tried to get the world to agree to a model of information control designed by the Chinese Communist Party.

Viewpoint

11.21.2014

“Getting Pantsed” by the “Central People’s Court”

Hu Yong

In December of last year CCTV producer Wang Qinglei wrote a post on his Weibo account criticizing the Chinese government’s campaign-style attacks on prominent social media figures and arguing the media had also been drawn in and was “...

Infographics

11.20.2014

Who Really Benefits from Poverty Alleviation in China?

A series of reports issued by China’s National Audit Office highlights problems in 19 counties that have received funding from national poverty alleviation programs. News of “impoverished counties’” constructing luxurious new government...

Conversation

11.19.2014

Was the U.S.-China Climate Deal Worth the Wait?

Deborah Seligsohn, Orville Schell, Joanna Lewis

Last week, Ann Carlson and Alex Wang, environmental experts at UCLA Law School, called the November 12 U.S.-China Joint Announcement on Climate Change “monumental.” “No two countries are more important to tackling the problem than the...

Environment

11.18.2014

Four Reasons Why the U.S.-China Climate Statement Matters

chinadialogue

The joint U.S.-China statement on climate change is both inspiring and historic. The two parties have sought common ground, set aside their differences, and put global interests first—as responsible great powers should.

Viewpoint

11.14.2014

The Domestic Politics of the U.S.-China Climate Change Announcement

Ann Carlson, Alex Wang

The news from Beijing this week that the U.S. and China are committing to ambitious goals on climate change is, we think, monumental. No two countries are more important to tackling the problem than the largest carbon emitter over the past...

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