Living in China’s Expanding Deserts

Josh Haner, Edward Wong, Derek Watkins...
New York Times
People on the edges of the country’s vast seas of sand are being displaced by climate change

In China, Close to 8,000 People are Vying for One Government Job

Josh Chin
Wall Street Journal
The job — with more than 7,700 applicants vying for a single position as of Sunday — is head of the reception office at the China Democratic League

Researcher Uncovers How Victims of China’s Cultural Revolution Really Died

Violet Law
Los Angeles Times
Her persistence has pierced the official silence enforced by the Chinese government. As time goes on, families of those who died are more willing to open up

Fake Divorce is Path to Riches Buying Hot China Real Estate

Rising property prices have been inspiring desperate measures, as frenzied buyers are seeking to act before further regulatory curbs are imposed



The Separation Between Mosque and State

Alice Y. Su
Driving through the Linxia Hui Autonomous Prefecture in Gansu province, in China’s northwest, minarets puncture the sky every few minutes. Many rise out of mosques that resemble Daoist temples, their details a blend of traditional Chinese and...

Pope Francis Targets Deal With China in Year of Mercy

Stephanie Kirchgaessner
Agreement on issue of Vatican’s right to appoint bishops in China would be biggest diplomatic feat of Francis’s papacy

China’s Urbanites Embrace Sacrifice to Ride Property Frenzy

Yawen Chen and Ryan Woo
There are signs mortgages are crimping household spending, in an economy increasingly reliant on domestic consumption

As Tensions Over Taiwan’s National Identity Reignite, Mainland Tourists Avoid the Island

Jessica Meyers
Los Angeles Times
Mainland tourism has dropped 20% since June, weeks after President Tsai took power and declined to endorse the One-China notion

China’s Local Governments Are Getting Into Venture Capital

Lulu Yilun Chen and Edwina Chan
China’s next billion-dollar startup could have backing from an investor with more money than Warren Buffett and a knack for promoting spicy duck-neck delicacies

Sinica Podcast


The Consequences of the One-Child Policy Will Be Felt for Generations

Kaiser Kuo, Jeremy Goldkorn & more from Sinica Podcast
The first day of 2016 marked the official end of China’s one-child policy, one of the most controversial and draconian approaches to population management in human history. The rules have not been abolished but modified, allowing all married Chinese...

I Broadcast Myself on the Chinese Web for Two Weeks

Viola Rothschild
In the process, I learned why Chinese millennials can't seem to unplug from the live-streaming craze...

China Lags Behind in Rule of Law Ranking

Josh Chin
WSJ: China Real Time Report
A new global ranking finds China is making limited progress

In Push for G.M.O.s, China Battles Fears of 8-Legged Chickens

Amie Tsang and Cao Li
New York Times
China has ambitions to be a major player in genetically modified food, but first it needs to dispel images of poisoned seeds and contaminated fields

China Worked Its Way into the Debate on the Topic of Abortion

Echo Huang Yinyin
Clinton's “Like they used to do in China” line might lead some to think the state no longer interferes with family planning--but it still does...

What China Sees in Donald Trump--and in Itself

Jiayang Fan
New Yorker
Chinese observers have described the Trump-Clinton standoff as a spectacle of unfettered “chaos” that shakes their faith in the legitimacy of Western democracy

Breakfast Cereal Prices Surge in China Following Appearance on Soap Opera

Huileng Tan
A shrewd product placement on a popular soap opera has propelled a Western breakfast cereal to frenzied popularity in China, sending prices up almost ten times in the gray market

Unlike the West, China and India Embrace Globalization

Bruce Stokes
In contrast with the developed West, globalization and economic integration remain popular in the world’s two largest developing countries—India and China.

How the Party’s Absolute Power Undermines its Efforts to Strengthen China’s Rule of Law

Cary Huang
South China Morning Post
While Chinese leaders support the need for a credible legal system, it is their iron-clad grip that is the stumbling block to its development

Crown’s Luck Runs Out as China Widens Casino Crackdown

Mike Cherney and Wayne Ma
Wall Street Journal
Foreign companies face inherent risks in attracting high-rollers from China, where gambling is illegal

As China Shifts From Exporter to Importer, Fortunes Change

Owen Guo and Neil Gough
New York Times
Daqing is home to China’s biggest oil field, and the city’s troubles reflect a broader reality for the country: Once a major exporter of oil, China is now one of the world’s biggest net oil importers.

China’s Real ‘House of Cards’: TV Series Unveils Graft Excess

Ting Shi
The eight-episode series, called “Always On the Road,” is being beamed daily to hundreds of millions of Chinese homes through Oct. 25 on CCTV’s Channel 1

Dalian Wanda’s Hollywood Event Is Itself a Production

Brooks Barnes
New York Times
"Star Wars" music. Ushers in gold evening gowns. The mayor of Los Angeles. Inside Dalian Wanda's Hollywood event...

The Limits of Chinese Isolationism

Alice Su
Can a country doing business all over the world really avoid other peoples' politics?...

Red Star Over Hollywood: ‘Dr. Evil’ Says China Wants Movies

Anousha Sakoui and David McLaughlin
Lobbyist questions companies’ motives in U.S. takeovers: ‘You will never see a Chinese villain in the movies’ again

Delia Davin Obituary

John Gittings
A pioneer of Chinese women’s studies who avoided the stereotypes offered by the communist regime and its critics

Chinese Billionaire Wang Jianlin Descends on Hollywood

Patrick Brzeski
Hollywood Reporter
Wanda's gala event at LACMA is expected to attract A-list stars and executives, as the company's outspoken chairman announces a major new production incentive in China...

Depth of Field


Over-Protective Mothers, E-cigarettes, Sports Hunting, and More

Ye Ming, Yan Cong & more from Yuanjin Photo
A photojournalist’s job is to capture the unique and the universal—to portray brief moments that tell individual stories, yet are instantly relatable to a wide audience. The delightful task of curating that type of Chinese photojournalism is the...



Green Growth Could Boost China’s Economy Six-Fold

from chinadialogue
China’s economy could grow six-fold by 2050 with renewable energy accounting for 69 percent of national electricity supply if it transforms its energy system and increases efficiency across the industrial, transport, construction, and electricity...

China Drops One-Child Policy, but ‘Exhausted’ Tiger Moms Say One is Plenty

Simon Denyer and Congcong Zhang
Washington Post
“No fines, no arrests. Go ahead and have a second child if you want one!” The problem is that many people don’t want a second child any more.

China’s Last Tiananmen Prisoner Set to be Freed, but Frail

Gillian Wong
New York Times
Miao Deshun, the 51-year-old former factory worker, is severely ill after spending more than half his life behind bars

Sinica Podcast


An American’s Seven Months in a Chinese Jail

Kaiser Kuo, Jeremy Goldkorn & more from Sinica Podcast
In 2009, Michael Manning was working in Beijing for a state-owned news broadcaster by day, but he spent his nights selling bags of hashish. His position with CCTV was easy and brought him into contact with Chinese celebrities, while his other trade...

China Warns “Hostile Forces” Trying to Undermine Military Reform

Ben Blanchard
After protests erupted in Beijing over lay-offs, China's military warned that "hostile forces" were spreading damaging online rumors...

Teenager is Convicted of Murder in 2014 Beating Death of USC Grad Student from China

Marisa Gerber
Los Angeles Times
The defendants told detectives they’d targeted Xinran Ji because he was Chinese and they suspected he had money

China’s Marriage Rate is Plummeting Because More Women are Choosing Autonomy over Intimacy

Xuan Li
One of the greatest fears of Chinese parents is coming true: China’s young people are turning away from marriage. The trend is also worrying the government

Trump: If Hillary Clinton Falls Down in China, Chinese People Will “Leave Her There”

Louise Liu
Business Insider
Chinese are "tough people" who would not help Clinton up if she fell down-- "They'll say 'Let her come up when she's ready.'"...

Police Recover 300 Million Yuan Worth of Stolen Sichuan Relics

Teng Jing Xuan
The two-year operation ends with 70 arrests and breakup of 10 criminal gangs

How Hong Kong's Cantopop Scene Went from Heartbreak to Protest

Helier Cheung
Cantonese pop music is formulaic, intensely emotional, strangely addictive and quintessentially Hong Kong. Now it is also becoming political.



Let One Hundred Panthers Bloom

Eveline Chao
“Chairman Mao says that death comes to all of us, but it varies in its significance: to die for the reactionary is lighter than a feather; to die for the revolution is heavier than Mount Tai.” So wrote Huey P. Newton, founder of the Black Panther...

Born in the U.S., Raised in China: ’Satellite Babies’ Have a Hard Time Coming Home

Hansi Lo Wang
Studies show the arrangement can take a great emotional toll on both parents and children

Beijing: Facebook & Google Can Come Back to China as long as They “Respect China’s Laws”

Josh Horwitz and Echo Huang Yinyin
Both companies still have business-facing services in China, but consumer-facing services have been blocked for years.

China Returns to Pedal Power

Adam Minter
With roads becoming less navigable by the day, citizens, entrepreneurs and the government are looking for alternatives. The solution: bring back the bike

China’s Internet Child-Safety Policies Could Force Changes at Tech Firms

Eva Dou and Li Yuan
Wall Street Journal
Tech companies doing business in China might have to adjust operations to comply with proposed rules

Poignant Portraits Show What it is Like Being LGBT in China

Kenneth Dickerman
Washington Post
Despite being decriminalized in 1997, homosexuality is still heavily stigmatized in China.

Is China's Gaokao The World's Toughest School Exam?

Alec Ash
Chinese children must endure years of stress and impossible expectations preparing for their final school exam

Dating Shows are a Massive Hit in China--and They're Changing Traditional Views on Love and Marriage

Pan Wang
Is “I’d rather weep in a BMW than laugh on a bike” becoming the norm?

Rebel Hong Kong Politicians Defy China at Chaotic Swearing-In Ceremony

Tom Phillips
Pro-democracy politicians cross fingers and make protest signs and subversive references to Beijing’s authoritarian rulers

China Targets Parents With Religion Rules in Xinjiang

Al Jazeera
Government denies committing abuses and says legal rights of Uighur people are protected as new laws are announced



The Red Guard Generation and Political Activism in China

Guobin Yang
Raised to be “flowers of the nation,” the first generation born after the founding of the People’s Republic of China was united in its political outlook and ambitions. Its members embraced the Cultural Revolution of 1966 but soon split into warring factions. Guobin Yang investigates the causes of this fracture and argues that Chinese youth engaged in an imaginary revolution from 1966 to 1968, enacting a political mythology that encouraged violence as a way to prove one’s revolutionary credentials. This same competitive dynamic would later turn the Red Guard against the communist government.Throughout the 1970s, the majority of Red Guard youth were sent to work in rural villages. These relocated revolutionaries developed an appreciation for the values of ordinary life, and an underground cultural movement was born. Rejecting idolatry, their new form of resistance marked a distinct reversal of Red Guard radicalism and signaled a new era of enlightenment, culminating in the Democracy Wall movement of the late 1970s and, finally, the Tiananmen protest of 1989. Yang completes his significant recasting of Red Guard activism with a chapter on the politics of history and memory, arguing that contemporary memories of the Cultural Revolution are factionalized along the lines of political division that formed 50 years before. —Columbia University Press{chop}

Protests Outside Chinese Defense Ministry at Army Cuts

More than 1,000 people walk and chant in Beijing in demonstration believed to be about pensions and personnel cuts

Death Toll from East China Residential Building Collapse Rises to 22

The latest survivor is a young girl, pulled from the rubble protected by the bodies of her parents, who were killed in the collapse.

Henan Province, a Butt of Jokes in China, Gets a Champion in Court

Chris Buckley
New York Times
Henan has a P.R. problem, but Jing Changshui has an answer. He’s suing.

Risk of Vanishing: More than 1,300 Elderly Go Missing in China Every Day

Chen Mengwei
China Daily
Online app helps find 100 lost seniors as research shows growing dementia threat

U.S. Presidential Debate Inspires Schadenfreude in China

Te-Ping Chen
WSJ: China Real Time Report
Many Chinese took to social media to heap scorn on both candidates

An Open Letter to the Woman Who Told My Family to Go Back to China

Michael Luo
New York Times
To the well-dressed woman on the Upper East Side, annoyed by our stroller, that yelled "Go back to China...Go back to your f---ing country"...

Tensions Rise Between South Korea and China After Chinese Tourists are Denied Entry to Jeju Island

Echo Huang Yinyin
Following a recent spate of violent crimes conducted by Chinese tourists, some Chinese tourists were barred from entering Jeju

China Anti-Corruption Campaign Backfires

Hudson Lockett
Financial Times
Xi Jinping drive to cleanse Communist party of graft tarnishes its image



The Age of Irreverence

Christopher Rea
The Age of Irreverence tells the story of why China’s entry into the modern age was not just traumatic, but uproarious. As the Qing dynasty slumped toward extinction, prominent writers compiled jokes into collections they called “histories of laughter.” In the first years of the Republic, novelists, essayists, and illustrators alike used humorous allegories to make veiled critiques of the new government. But, again and again, political and cultural discussion erupted into invective, as critics gleefully jeered and derided rivals in public. Farceurs drew followings in the popular press, promoting a culture of practical joking and buffoonery. Eventually, these various expressions of hilarity proved so offensive to high-brow writers that they launched a concerted campaign to transform the tone of public discourse, hoping to displace the old forms of mirth with a new one they called youmo (humor).Christopher Rea argues that this period—from the 1890s to the 1930s—transformed how Chinese people thought and talked about what is funny. Focusing on five cultural expressions of laughter—jokes, play, mockery, farce, and humor—he reveals the textures of comedy that were a part of everyday life during modern China’s first “age of irreverence.” This new history of laughter not only offers an unprecedented and up-close look at a neglected facet of Chinese cultural modernity, but also reveals its lasting legacy in the Chinese language of the comic today and its implications for our understanding of humor as a part of human culture. —University of California Press{chop}

The ‘Patriotic Education’ of Chinese Students at Australian Universities

Alexander Joske and Philip Wen
Sydney Morning Herald
As larger numbers of Chinese students study abroad, greater efforts are being made to ensure they do not return with new-found opposition to the Communist Party

Anger on Streets in China as Football Team Suffer Shock Defeat by War-Torn Syria

Tom Phillips
Disgruntled fans demand that president of football association is sacked as hopes for a football revolution suffer a blow

China Seeks Tighter Grip in Wake of a Religious Revival

Ian Johnson
New York Times
Increased regulations on religion are the latest move by President Xi to strengthen the Communist Party’s control over society and combat foreign influences.