Collis Professor of History, Dartmouth College, Pamela Kyle Crossley is a specialist on the Qing empire and modern China, and also writes on Central and Inner Asian history, global history, and the history of horsemanship in Eurasia before the modern period. The Faculty Project invited her to create the video series, "Modern China," and her documentary on Asian horsemanship was featured in the Asian Arts Theatre festival, Gwangju, South Korea, in 2013. Crossley is the author of six books and co-author of two leading textbooks on global history. Her work has been awarded the Joseph R. Levenson Prize of the Association for Asian Studies (for a book in any discipline addressing China before 1800), a Guggenheim fellowship, and numerous other grants. Her books have been translated into Chinese, Japanese, Korean, French, Spanish, Portuguese, and Polish. Shorter research works have appeared in The Cambridge History of China, The Cambridge History of World Slavery, and The Cambridge History of Warfare, and in scholarly journals including American Historical Review, Journal of Asian Studies, and Annales. Her commentary has appeared in popular publications including The London Review of Books, The New Republic, New York Times Book Review, History Today, Royal Academy of Arts Magazine, The National Interest, The Wall Street Journal, and the BBC. Her most recent book on China is The Wobbling Pivot: China since 1800 (Wiley/Blackwell, 2010).

Last Updated: March 23, 2016

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