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China Media Project

From their website:

The China Media Project leverages the Journalism & Media Studies Centre’s experienced staff faculty and its extensive contacts with mainland Chinese media and its unique position at the doorsteps of China to generate systematic, multi-facted research in the field of Chinese journalism.

JMSC established the China Media Project in late 2003. The project is directed by Qian Gang, a veteran Chinese journalist and well-known author of several books on journalism, and Yuen-ying Chan, an award-winning journalist and educator as well as founder and director of JMSC.

Last Updated: July 7, 2016

A Softer Touch on Soft Power

David Bandurski
China Media Project
Soft power has become strategically important for China because cultural productivity and influence are now regarded as important components of comprehensive national power.

Ali Baba’s Cave and Pandora’s Box

David Bandurski
China Media Project
When Lu Wei — the man who reportedly led the crackdown on the “Big V” Weibo account holders last year — was asked at a press conference why sites like Facebook (which is blocked in China) had been “shut down,” he responded with a homespun metaphor.

China Quietly Gives Global News Awards

David Bandurski
China Media Project
Although the WMS was, according to Chinese state media, “co-launched by Xinhua News Agency and other major media organizations around the world,” the event has always been solidly China’s prerogative.

China’s “Seven Base Lines” for a Clean Internet

David Bandurski
China Media Project
Run down the list of the “Seven Base Lines” and it is painfully obvious that this is part of a new government initiative to assert stronger control over online speech. This is yet another internet tightening in China ostensibly...

(Editorial) Why Southern Weekly Said “No”

QIan Gang
China Media Project
The road to freedom of expression as guaranteed in Article 35 of China’s Constitution will be a long one.

A Bowl of Hot Porridge: A Song for Southern Weekend

David Bandurski
China Media Project
The Beijing News published a loving tribute, yes, to porridge. In particular, to the porridge of the south. But it is really a song of love and support for Southern Weekly. 

Inside the Southern Weekly Incident

David Bandurski
China Media Project
A Hong Kong University media scholar's review of the strife that led to a strike at one of China's most influential newspapers...

Rule of Law: A Ring to Bind China's Internet (Analysis)

David Bandurski
China Media Project
China’s new propaganda chief, Liu Qibao, has laid out an agenda for increased political controls on the Internet.

Poeple's Daily: Be Good Online, Please

David Bandukski
China Media Project
People’s Daily cautions that the Internet is as much a tool of rumor and misinformation as a platform for information sharing. 

Party Report Suggests Old Guard is Strong

Qian Gang
China Media Project
My preliminary conclusion: conservative forces within the Party are still very powerful. According to the line marked out by the political report to the 18th National Congress, there is very little prospect that substantive moves will be made on...

Clubs and Cameras: Stability Preservation in the Age of Weibo

David Bandurski
China Media Project
Many images and video posted to Chinese social media from the scene in Ningbo have already been deleted — and some users reported Sunday that Ningbo-based users were unable to post content. But Sina Weibo and other platforms remain the primary...

The Mixed Bag of Socialism

Qian Gang
China Media Project
Ahead of the 18th National Congress, the phrase “socialism with Chinese characteristics” is as strong as ever.

Qian Gang: The Power of Separation

Qian Gang
China Media Project
If I suggested to my audience that “separation of powers,” the tripartite model of state governance common to many of the world’s democracies, exists in the Chinese Communist Party too, they would probably revile me. “You must be...

Total Denial and the Will to Forget

Qian Gang
China Media Project
Anyone who regularly observes the topsy-turvy world of Chinese politics understands that the past, even the remote past, can exert a powerful influence on the present and future. Major historical anniversaries — like that of the 1989 Tiananmen...

State Media Call For “Rational” Patriotism

David Bandurski
China Media Project
After two days of violent anti-Japanese protests in China stemming from a territorial dispute over a chain of islands in the East China Sea, media in China are now calling on the public to remain calm and “rational,” apparently concerned about how...