Yu-Jie Chen is a lawyer and for the current academic year a visiting scholar at Columbia University’s Weatherhead East Asian Institute. She received her J.S.D. and L.L.M. degrees from New York University School of Law. She also holds an L.L.M. and L.L.B. from National Chengchi University in Taiwan.

Chen has had extensive experience as a research scholar for the U.S.-Asia Law Institute of NYU School of Law, where she focused on criminal justice and human rights developments in Taiwan and China. Prior to that, she served as a researcher and advocate for the non-governmental organization Human Rights in China. She has also practiced in the Taipei-based international law firm Lee and Li.

Chen has published both journalistic op-eds and scholarly essays. Her academic publications include “One Problem, Two Paths: A Taiwanese Perspective on the Exclusionary Rule in China” (N.Y.U. Journal of International Law & Politics, Volume 43, No. 3, 2011), “Lawyers’ Activism and the Expansion of the Right to Counsel in Taiwan” (Comparative Perspectives on Criminal Justice in China, edited by Mike McConville and Eva Pils, 2013), and “Human Rights in China-Taiwan Relations: How Taiwan Can Engage China,” (Hong Kong Law Journal, Volume 45, Part 2, 2015).

Last Updated: December 5, 2016

Viewpoint

04.20.17

A Taiwanese Man’s Detention in Guangdong Threatens a Key Pillar of Cross-Straits Relations

Jerome A. Cohen & Yu-Jie Chen
Update: On March 26, China’s Taiwan Affairs Office announced that Taiwanese human rights activist Lee Ming-che had been formally arrested on charges of “subverting state power.” Jerome Cohen has added a new comment to this essay. To skip to that...

Conversation

12.05.16

Should Washington Recalibrate Relations with Taipei?

Yu-Jie Chen, J. Michael Cole & more
On Friday, Donald Trump shocked the China-watching world when news broke that he had spoken on the phone to Taiwan President Tsai Ing-wen. The call was remarkable not for its content—Tsai’s office said she told Trump she hoped the United States “...