Sheena Chestnut Greitens is Associate Professor at the LBJ School of Public Affairs at the University of Texas at Austin, where she is affiliated with both the Clements Center for National Security and the Strauss Center for International Security and Law. Her work focuses on American national security, East Asia, and authoritarian politics and foreign policy. Her first book, Dictators and their Secret Police: Coercive Institutions and State Violence (Cambridge, 2016) received the 2017 Best Book Award from both the International Studies Association and the Comparative Democratization section of the American Political Science Association. She has previously testified to Congress on security issues in the Indo-Pacific, and on technological surveillance in China. Greitens previously served as Assistant Professor at the University of Missouri (2015-2020) and as First Lady of Missouri (2017-2018), where she helped lead the state’s trade mission to South Korea and China. She holds a Doctorate from Harvard University; an M.Phil. from Oxford University, where she studied as a Marshall Scholar; and a Bachelor’s degree from Stanford University. She is also a Non-Resident Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution, an Adjunct Fellow with the Korea Chair at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, an Associate in Research at the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies at Harvard University, and a member of the Digital Freedom Forum at the Center for a New American Security.

Last Updated: August 28, 2020

Conversation

08.27.20

The Future of China Studies in the U.S.

Sheena Greitens, Rebecca E. Karl & more
As an extraordinarily fraught school year begins, the study of China on U.S. campuses (or their new virtual equivalents), as well as China’s role in university life more broadly, has recently become a subject of scrutiny and debate. What is the...

Conversation

03.09.17

Is THAAD the Start of a U.S.-China Arms Race?

Isaac Stone Fish, Graham Webster & more
In late February, U.S. President Donald Trump called for adding $54 billion to the U.S. military budget—an increase of roughly 10 percent. And in early March, despite outcry from Beijing, the United States began deploying the Terminal High-Altitude...